Tag: poets

Breakfast of Champions

breakfast of champions on justruminating men's blog

If a diamond is forever,
then love is the San Francisco treat.
Just a little dab’ll do ya
so be all that you can be.

It’s the cheesiest, so just do it
you can have it your way.
So reach out and touch someone
it’s the best part of waking up.

And like a good neighbor, there’s
love and no more tears.
Once you pop, you can’t stop for
nobody does it like Sara Lee.

She lets her fingers do the walking
promise her anything, but give her love.
She’s come a long way baby
and brings good things to life.

But when it rains, I see it pours
and I deserve a break today.
For a mind is a terrible thing to waste
does she…or doesn’t she?

Her love is good to the last drop
so don’t treat your puppy like a dog!
Celebrate the moments of your life,
And don’t leave home without them.

I fly her friendly skies, they’re great
and I can have it my own way.
Keeps going, and going, and going
She is the pause that refreshes.

Takes a licking and keeps on ticking
nothing comes between me and my girl.
She tastes great though her love is less filling
I can’t believe I ate the whole thing!

Great Poets Read: Wallace Stevens (pt. II)

Welcome to my new series, Great Poets Read. I have a great collection of famous poets reading their poetry, so I thought I would share them with you!

Charles Osgood narrates an introduction to the poet in the first recording, then I include a recording from the poet, as well as the text to the poem. I hope you enjoy hearing masterful works of poetry coming to life as much as I do!

Wallace Stevens

stevens

Introduction To Robinson Wallace Stevens by Charles Osgood

Not Ideas About The Thing But The Thing Itself

At the earliest ending of winter,
In March, a scrawny cry from outside
Seemed like a sound in his mind.

He knew that he heard it,
A bird’s cry, at daylight or before,
In the early March wind.

The sun was rising at six,
No longer a battered panache above snow…
It would have been outside.

It was not from the vast ventriloquism
Of sleep’s faded papier-mache…
The sun was coming from the outside.

That scrawny cry–It was
A chorister whose c preceded the choir.
It was part of the colossal sun,

Surrounded by its choral rings,
Still far away. It was like
A new knowledge of reality.

Great Poets Read: Wallace Stevens (pt. I)

Welcome to my new series, Great Poets Read. I have a great collection of famous poets reading their poetry, so I thought I would share them with you!

Charles Osgood narrates an introduction to the poet in the first recording, then I include a recording from the poet, as well as the text to the poem. I hope you enjoy hearing masterful works of poetry coming to life as much as I do!

Wallace Stevens

stevens

Introduction To Robinson Wallace Stevens by Charles Osgood

Bantams In Pine Woods

Chieftain Iffucan of Azcan in caftan
Of tan with henna hackles, halt!

Damned universal cock, as if the sun
Was blackamoor to bear your blazing tail.

Fat!  Fat!  Fat!  Fat!  I am the personal.
Your world is you.  I am my world.

You ten-foot poet among inchlings. Fat!
Begone! An inchling bristles in these pines,

Bristles, and points their Appalachian tangs,
And fears not portly Azcan nor his hoos.

Great Poets Read: Robinson Jeffers

Welcome to my new series, Great Poets Read. I have a great collection of famous poets reading their poetry, so I thought I would share them with you!

Charles Osgood narrates an introduction to the poet in the first recording, then I include a recording from the poet, as well as the text to the poem. I hope you enjoy hearing masterful works of poetry coming to life as much as I do!

Robinson Jeffers

jeffers on justruminating men's blog

Introduction To Robinson Jeffers by Charles Osgood

Day Is A Poem

This morning Hitler spoke in Danzig, we hear his voice.
A man of genius: that is, of amazing
Ability, courage, devotion, cored on a sick child’s soul,
Heard clearly through the dog wrath, a sick child
Wailing in Danzig; invoking destruction and wailing at it.
Here, the day was extremely hot; about noon
A south wind like a blast from hell’s mouth spilled a slight rain
On the parched land, and at five a light earthquake
Danced the house, no harm done. Tonight I have been amusing myself
Watching the blood-red moon droop slowly
Into the black sea through bursts of dry lightning and distant thunder.
Well: the day is a poem: but too much
Like one of Jeffers’s, crusted with blood and barbaric omens,
Painful to excess, inhuman as a hawk’s cry.

Great Poets Read: Robert Frost (Pt. III)

Welcome to my new series, Great Poets Read. I have a great collection of famous poets reading their poetry, so I thought I would share them with you!

Charles Osgood narrates an introduction to the poet in the first recording, then I include a recording from the poet, as well as the text to the poem. I hope you enjoy hearing masterful works of poetry coming to life as much as I do!

Robert Frost

frost on justruminating men's blog

Introduction To Robert Frost by Charles Osgood

Ovenbird

There is a singer everyone has heard,
Loud, a mid-summer and a mid-wood bird,
Who makes the solid tree trunks sound again.
He says that leaves are old and that for flowers
Mid-summer is to spring as one to ten.
He says the early petal-fall is past
When pear and cherry bloom went down in showers
On sunny days a moment overcast;
And comes that other fall we name the fall.
He says the highway dust is over all.
The bird would cease and be as other birds
But that he knows in singing not to sing.
The question that he frames in all but words
Is what to make of a diminished thing.